Church of England School of the Resurrection

Belong, Believe, Achieve

Pupil Premium

Pupil Premium is additional funding provided by the Government to schools to support specific groups of children who may be vulnerable to possible underachievement. These include children who are, or have ever been in the last six years, entitled to free school meals, children whose parents are members of the armed forces and those who are Looked After by the Local Authority.

 Barriers to learning our pupil experience.

83% of our children are from backgrounds described as "urban adversity". Many families struggle financially and although many are in work, they do not have well paid jobs. In such situations they provide for their children's immediate needs but are unable to finance a rich and varied life experience.

We address this by subsidizing school uniform allowing all pupils to feel part of the school community, boosting their self esteem and providing  equality of clothing reducing pressure on parents to provide clothing of the latest fashion.

Wow experiences and high quality educational visits and experiences are funded for all children with a request for a small donation towards transport costs, often only £3. This provides context for the children's understanding and gives opportunities for our children to visit places that many more affluent children take for granted. (the zoo, the beach, museums, the theatre). All pupils Year2-Year6 have the opportunity to learn a musical instrument. (violin, flute, clarinet, keyboard, recorder, ukulele).

Many of our children do not come from language rich backgrounds, school trips support the development of specific and precise vocabulary. Lexia is particularly helpful in the identification of language needs and addressing them in a personalized way.

The opportunities we offer our pupils allow them to see beyond their immediate environment. We hope that in providing these experiences we can raise their aspirations as they become aware of the wealth of opportunities available to them. This is particularly important when we consider that many of our parents have not had the opportunity to access further education.

Our pupils need to feel valued, they need to build resilience and self confidence. Increasing the number of teaching assistants, additional support ensures that pupils and their families have the opportunities to access some specialist support and also more personal time with an adult.

We believe that our use of Pupil Premium funding is very effective.

 

  

2019 – 2020

Our planned spending has been based on last year’s figures, £123.475 (91 pupils + 12 EYFS pupils)

At this stage, we do not know how our figures will change from last year.

 

Planned spending:

 

Teaching Assistants £75,000

Breakfast Club staffing £15,000

Additional Educational Psychology £1,585

Additional Music tuition £7,000

Lexia  £6,900

Accelerated Reader subscription £5,000

Trips and transport £6,000

Uniform subsidy £5,000

Arts and drama projects £2000 

 

 

Pupil Premium Review 2018-2019

Our initial plans were based on figures for the previous year, 95 pupils raising £125,400. And 5 Early Years pupils generating £1510.50 making a total of £126,910.50.

Numbers have fallen and the Jan18 census identified only 89 children and 5 Early Years children. Our revised budget was £120,278.40.

Teaching Assistants.  £75,000

Every class was supported by its own dedicated teaching assistant. Teaching assistants opened their classrooms at 8.40am when they started working with children and supported them in developing their spelling.

The impact of this was two-fold:

  • A daily opportunity was provided for a trained member of staff to support children’s spelling ensuring that more children are having regular spelling practice.
  • As the classroom door is opened, parents can see that children are already working. The effect of this has been that parents are keen to get their children into the lesson reducing the amount of time taken for children to start their school day.

Class teachers were able to plan for their teaching assistant knowing that they would have the support to provide small group intervention either by using the teaching assistant to deliver it or by delivering it themselves whilst the teaching assistant supervised the rest of the class.

The impact of this:

  • More opportunities for personalized learning and thereby raising standards and addressing children’s misconceptions more promptly.

This year we have had a significant amount of teacher absence. Five of eight classes have had at least two teachers.

The impact of this:

  • should not be underestimated, however, it must be recognized that it was reduced because the class teaching assistants have provided consistency and stability.
  • The impact of this is that behaviour has not deteriorated, new teachers have been able to take over quickly.

A Teaching assistant monitors the amount of time children are spending and their scores on both Lexia and Accelerated reader.

The Impact of this :

  • Information is passed to the class teacher and teaching assistant allowing them respond by encouraging children and providing intervention where it is needed.
  • Children are making improved progress in Reading.

 

The table below shows the number of children in each group (Pupil Premium and Non Pupil premium) and the amount of progress that they made.

(2 children in Year 4 and one in Year 6  have EHC Plans and are in the PP group).

Year

Children in school for whole of school year

Less than expected progress

Expected progress

More than expected progress

 

P.P

Not P.P

P.P

Not P.P

P.P

Not P.P

P.P

Not P.P

6

18

10

 

2

9

4

9

4

5

17

11

6

 

3

7

8

4

4

15

15

2

 

5

2

8

13

3

11

18

3

7

7

8

1

2

2

9

18

2

2

6

13

1

3

1

7

21

1

1

2

6

4

14

 

One teaching assistant provides additional support for children identified as failing to meet the expected levels across the school. The children that she worked with made excellent progress.

Homework/Club

A contribution towards the purchase of resources and the staffing costs of our After school clubs which have run throughout the year 3.15-4pm.

Clubs open to all children this year have included: art, crafts, choir and homework.

Clubs with restricted numbers due to the nature of the club: science, sport and booster.

The impact of this provision:

  • This provision supports working parents as the places for clubs are free.
  • It also supports parents who find it difficult to help their children with their homework.
  • Resources are provided free offering the chance for children to access resources their parents might not be in a position to purchase eg: paint, sewing and craft resources.
  • The children enjoy the activities and take pride in their work.
  • Children learn new skills that there is not time in to include in the curriculum.
  • Most Booster club children were supported in reaching their SATS targets.

 

Breakfast Club staffing  £10,500

Breakfast club is open to all children and is free of charge. School funds the staff through the use of Pupil Premium funding, Greggs support by providing the food.

About seventy children attend breakfast club. The club opens at 7.30.

The impact of this:

  • Every child is able to start the day with a healthy breakfast. Sometimes, children will come after the club has closed, they are still provided with a breakfast.
  • SATS breakfast, a special breakfast of bacon/sausage sandwiches and croissants, ensured that all children were in school on time. This was important as it allowed us to check that our children were fed and settled before the start of the day.
  • Breakfast club offers us the opportunity to provide a calm environment for children to read. During this time some children read to adults, many do not read to an adult at home. Children may also use the personalized reading programme, Lexia also funded through Pupil premium.
  • These interventions, have been influential in raising our reading scores.

 

Caritis £7,778

This funding was allocated to provide support for children and parents however our Caritas worker went on maternity leave. She was replaced briefly but not for the full year. In view of the significant number of changes in staffing over the few years that we have funded a support worker, we have decided not continue with this provision. (As a result of this, some funding was not spent).

We had hoped to run a parent support group this year but the number of changes meant that relationships had not been built up with parents and we were unable to encourage the parents that we felt this would benefit to attend. 

Prior to the finishing of our worker, the impact was:

  • One child finding it difficult to leave her mum in the mornings is now coming into school by herself.

 

  • Several parents were supported by the worker on a one to one basis.
  • Some children were able to access weekly group teaching aimed to give them strategies to support relaxation and social skills.

Additional Educational Psychology £6,145

Pupil premium funding subsided the funding provided by our SEN allocated budget to increase the amount of Educational Psychology time purchased.

The majority of children seen by our Educational Psychologist usually are allocated an EHCPlan. Our high number of children requiring this level of support means that we are not currently in a position to allocate Educational Psychology time for advice only.

Additional Music tuition £7,000

This funding is added to the funding provided through the Manchester Music Hub. We are able to fund the cost of two specialist teachers for one afternoon a week all year and the loan of some musical instruments.

One teacher, teaches recorder to Years 2 and 3 as a whole class group. This means that the children learn the recorder for two full years allowing them to gain some proficiency with this instrument.

This teacher also teaches woodwind and brass.

Another teacher teaches keyboard and violin.

All children in years 5 and 6 learn to play woodwind, brass, violin or keyboard. Again, the children have lessons for two years.

Whilst lessons are based around the child’s musical instrument general musicianship skills are also being taught.

The impact of this:

  • Last year five Year 6 children gained their grade one
  • The secondary schools that the children attend are unlikely to provide free instrumental lessons for all. All our children have had the opportunity to learn to play, they may not have another chance to do this.
  • Our children have an appreciation and understanding of different styles of music. This is shown in their ability to listen to performance, live and recorded and discuss what they have heard, expressing opinions and using the correct musical vocabulary.

Lexia £6,900

This is a programme which provides explicit, systematic, personalized learning in the six areas of reading instruction, targeting skill gaps as they emerge, and providing teachers with the data and student-specific resources they need for individual or small-group instruction.

Children work through the programme at their own pace. Progress is monitored by a teaching assistant who feeds back to their teachers and teaching assistants.

The impact of this is:

  • Most of our Key stage 2 children and some of our Key Stage 1 children use the Lexia programme allowing them tailor made computerized support.
  • It is one of the strategies that has been effective in helping us to raise our standards in reading.
  • The scheme provides us with detailed information about each child’s development of reading skills allowing additional support to be targeted.

Trips and Transport £6,000

The curriculum is supported by many trips. Coaches are expensive and wherever possible we use the trams.

All children access several trips during the school year. (Including children in EYFS). We deliberately keep down the costs to parents and all children are taken on trips regardless of any parental contribution. On some occasions this year, children with additional needs have been transported by taxi rather than using the tram to reduce the need to walk through busy streets.

  • Children have first hand experience that they would not otherwise have had. This is vital for disadvantaged children who often do not access places of arts or culture.
  • Experience supports the development of language building technical and descriptive vocabulary. This is important to us as we have many children who do not come from a vocabulary rich environment.
  • Trips have a positive impact on our children’s reading and writing.

Uniform Subsidy £5,372

Uniform subsidy enables parents to buy good quality school uniform at reduced costs. On occasions, where we are aware of hardship, school uniform has been given to parents without cost.

The impact of wearing school uniform;

  • This supports the sense of belonging and community.
  • Research suggests that uniform has a positive impact on behaviour and we believe this is so.
  • All our children look equal supporting inclusion.

 

Science, Arts and drama projects £2,000

Year 5 were able to take part in a funded song writing project however, transport had to be provided for them to attend the RNCM.

Years 2 and 6 took part in an African drumming and dance workshop.

Year 3 took part in Play in Day, a play to support their understanding of ecological issues and energy.

For our Key Stage 2 Christmas production we hired a theatre and transported all Key Stage 2 to it allowing them to gain authentic experience of performing on a stage.

The impact of this:

  • A small group of our pupils continue to be involved with the theatre outside school hours.
  • The children gained a deeper sense of pride and achievement.

Year 5 children took part in the dance section of the Rochdale Festival. Whilst the children were trained by school staff, a coach transported the children to the festival.

 

  • Science club children were able to take away the results of their engineering. We believe that this sort of tailored programme will inspire some of our more able scientists to have engineering career aspirations.